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Jeroen Buijs, PhD

Jeroen Buijs is a senior researcher at the Einthoven Laboratory for Vascular and Regenerative Medicine at the Div. Thrombosis and Hemostasis (Dept. Internal Medicine, LUMC), and his research focuses on the interactions between cancer and coagulation. During his Ph.D. (obtained in 2009) at the Dept. of Endocrinology (LUMC) he studied the interactions of breast and prostate cancer with the bone microenvironment, showing that specific inhibition of RANKL by Fc-OPG (now on the market as denosumab) resulted in a near complete inhibition of cancer-induced bone destruction. As a postdoctoral fellow (2010-2011) at the Indiana University (USA), he received a prostate cancer training award from the DoD to set up a multidisciplinary study for radiation of bone (metastases). Upon return in the LUMC at the department of Urology, he received a Veni grant (2012-2015) from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) to study the interactions of cancer stem cell-targeted agents in breast and prostate cancer. Since 2016 he is recruited to the Einthoven Laboratory for Vascular and Regenerative Medicine to study the interactions between cancer and coagulation in fundamental as well as clinically oriented projects, while supervising PhD-students as co-promoter.

Jeroen Buijs has an H-factor of 22, published 39 peer-reviewed publications (of which 18 first/senior author), which have been cited 2035x (Publons, Aug. 5th). He serves the Editorial Boards of Cancers (2020 – current) and BioMed Research International – Oncology (2012-2020), the Reviewer Board of Cancers (2019 – ), and has acted as reviewer and chairman at the conference of Dutch Thrombosis Society (NVTH).

Links to professional profiles:
Einthoven laboratory
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Research
The focus of Jeroen Buijs’ research is to better understand the interactions between cancer and thrombosis.
Specific research lines:
1. Development of new cancer and thrombosis in vivo models to study the effects of cancer on thrombosis, and vice versa, the effects of (anti-)coagulation on cancer progression.
2. Identification of novel plasma biomarkers using a mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics approach to better select patients at high risk for cancer-associated thrombosis for thromboprophylaxis.
3. Discovery of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT) gene signatures in glioblastoma, pancreatic cancer, osteosarcoma and colorectal cancer, using next generation mRNA and microRNA sequencing, and targeted DNA sequencing.
4. Subsequent validation of CAT-gene signatures by genetical modification of tumor cells and testing in in in vitro coagulation assay and cancer & thrombosis preclinical models.